Tag Archives: website designers

Meetings – What to Take

Documents

I see young web designers always carry a laptop/tablet to meetings. What for?

I have loaded my portfolio onto a laptop with the idea that prospects will be able to browse through them. Or, I can quickly lay my hands on a specific example of the sort of website they might be wanting.

It doesn’t work. However, I still take the netbook to show that I am something to do with computers.

I used to print screengrabs of my portfolio and put them in transparent pockets. The screengrabs were printed on coated paper for colour density and simply glued on the page.

The folder of screengrabs always gets attention if you remember to leave it out on the table. And you can still lay your hands on that site.

DSCN1355Pic Folder

Lately, I upgraded the folder. I either printed my own postcard sized screengrabs or got them done at a Postnet. And stuck them on black card. And bought a plastic comb binder. And put a transparent sheet as the front and back cover.

Now they look presentable. I also made sure that the visually appealing sites were at the front. As new sites arrive, I can print grabs and add them.

What else? A company profile is worth putting together and leaving behind. One thing that is useful is a file of AWStats printouts to show the prospect what he can expect both in terms of traffic and general information.

Also take any relevant emails – they’re more useful than you think.

I also take an exercise book and couple of pencils. I bought a very fancy plain paper, leather bound book in India. Very striking. I usually make notes in it and prospects do remember that book. It’s got a huge clasp on the front that presents a massive lump that is almost impossible to write on. But they remember that book.

Pic Books

Your Bag

As long as it’s not shabby and unprofessional, anything will do – even an old leather briefcase. I use a black nylon laptop bag that will take the laptop and also has a bunch of pockets for things like a laser pointer, the cellphone (ALWAYS turn it OFF) and car keys (don’t have them bulging out of your pocket). I also have a simpler document bag, also black and nylon for short non-prospect meetings. In both bags is a supply of business cards. I also put one in my shirt pocket so that it can be produced with a flourish.

Pic Bag

OK, You’re cool and out the car. Carry your bag in your left hand. You’re going  to shake hands. Prospects will not like to shake hands with something that’s hot and very sweaty.

Do Not Change What They Want!

An  easy mistake to make.

You can see clearly that what your client wants is deficient in some way and you have the right answer at your fingertips. If it’s something related to the design of the website and it’s not a show stopper, let him have it.

My experience is that all you end up doing by inserting your sensible improvement is upset the client. Even if you get your way, there is still residual resentment. It’s a little thing he thinks he got right and you got wrong.

Even if you win a couple of battles, your client will declare war and you will definitely lose.

I Like this – and this – Oh, and this . . .

Every website designer has had clients who think they’re doing everyone a favour by suggesting other websites that they have seen and liked. Sometimes we make things more difficult for ourselves by telling them to come up with a website example. I have done this for years on & off and to be honest, it’s rarely worked.

Clients have little idea of the complexity and cost of other websites. Because you have quoted them R10,000, they think every other website on the Internet costs the same. After you have quoted, they will suggest a website that they like and upon a little investigation it is plain that this website costs way more than R10,000, sometimes at least ten times more and has a permanent web team of five people.

Explain this to the client and they think you’re looking for an excuse to nickel and dime their website with the unsaid suggestion that after quoting you really have no idea what they want.

websitesThe other thing is the ‘multiple examples’. The client will suggest typically two or three websites that are completely dissimilar but he likes elements of – but doesn’t tell you which elements. This is a real recipe for disaster because eventually, after buggering about, they still won’t like what you offer.

I then tell them that they’re suffering from Analysis Paralysis and ditch all the suggestions and start from basic principals. They fixate on the graphics which are among the easiest elements to change. You tell them that the website will sink or swim depending on the words and pics and how they are laid out.

As a side matter, the problem with colours extends all over the place. ‘We decided on this colour but I see when I got back that you’ve changed it’.

No I haven’t. My computer display is set differently to yours – and your ambient lighting is different – and maybe you’re using Mac . . .

I usually make them choose one – or none – and then perhaps MAY introduce elements from the other websites as development proceeds.

confusedI had a request for a quotation the other day – ‘We want a website with the sort of functionality but a different skin of this site.’ Now, when you look at ‘this‘ site, it has nothing to do with their core business. If they have a website address on their email I always check it out and also look at the code and who designed it.

That statement above is all I get to submit a quote on. And they wonder why the quote changes so much when I know more about what they want.  Prospects love to lock you in to a price range before they deliver the ‘Oh, by the way, we also want a database and eCommerce.’

After years of frustration and irritation all round, I think it’s best not to suggest any layout but come up with what you think is appropriate – and generally they’re happy.

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